Carbon Cycle


section1=CarbonCycle section2=Events
17th and 18th Global Warming International Conference & Expo  
http://www.globalwarming.net/
 The  Editor. 2006.



The 17th Global Warming International Conference & Expo (GW17) was held 20-21 April, 2006 in Miami, FL, U.S.A. They discussed the importance of Climate Change time constants. The U.S. recently announced that the 18th GWIC will be held at the Sheraton Convention Center in Miami, FL, U.S.A on April 19 and 20, 2007. This meeting represents the oldest consistently sustained conference that is dedicated to the exchange of scientific data, governmental assessments and public policies concerning global climate change, including global warming and extreme climate events.




Addition links on this article: http://www.globalwarming.net/




section1=CarbonCycle section2=Events
2006 AGU Fall Meeting and 2007 Joint Assembly  
http://www.agu.org/meetings/
 The Editor. 2006.

The 2006 AGU Fall Meeting, scheduled for 11-15 December 2006, in San Francisco, CA, U.S.A, will provide an opportunity for more than 12,000 researchers, teachers, students, and consultants to present and review the latest issues affecting the Earth, the planets, and their environments in space. As part of the 2006 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting (AGU), a symposium is being organized entitled "Regional to Continental-Scale Carbon Cycle Science: Progress in the North American Carbon Program, CarboEurope, and Related Programs". The symposium will have three specific foci: measurements and modeling, mechanistic understanding, and decision-support. The 2007 Joint Assembly will be held May 21-25, 2007 in Acapulco, Mexico. The Program Committee is developing a Union-wide science program that will cover topics in all areas of geophysical sciences.




Addition links on this article: http://www.agu.org/meetings/




section1=CarbonCycle section2=Publications
SOCCR Draft Report  
http://cdiac.ornl.gov/SOCCR/
 The  Editor. 2006.

Understanding the North American carbon budget, both sources and sinks, is critical to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program goal of providing the best possible scientific information to support public discussion, as well as government and private sector decision making, on key climate-related issues. In response, the First State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR) was prepared and provides a synthesis, integration and assessment of the current knowledge of the North American carbon budget and its context within the global carbon cycle. The Report is organized as a response to questions about the North American carbon budget relevant to carbon management policy options and a broad range of stakeholder groups interested in knowledge of carbon cycling in North America and of how such knowledge might be used to influence or make decisions. The questions were identified through early and continuing dialogue with these stakeholder groups, including scientists, decision makers in the public sector (Federal, State, and local governments), the private sector (carbon-related industry, including energy, transportation, agriculture, and forestry sectors; and climate policy and carbon management interest groups), the international community, and the general public. The draft version of the SOCCR report is now available. The North American Carbon Budget and Implications for the Global Carbon Cycle report addresses carbon emissions; natural reservoirs and sequestration; rates of transfer; the consequences of changes in carbon cycling on land and the ocean; effects of purposeful carbon management; effects of agriculture, forestry, and natural resource management on the carbon cycle; and the socio-economic drivers and consequences of changes in the carbon cycle.




Addition links on this article: http://cdiac.ornl.gov/SOCCR/




section1=CarbonCycle section2=FocusAreas
ORNL Climate Research   
http://climate.ornl.gov/
  The Editor. 2005.

The Coupled Carbon Cycle Climate Model Intercomparison Project (C4MIP), a joint project between IGBP-GAIM and WCRP-WGCM, is designed to compare and analyze the feedbacks between the carbon cycle and climate in the presence of external climate forcing. Such feedbacks are likely to be mediated on the one hand by altered forcing of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles and on the other by the impact of altered CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere resulting from this forcing. The basic approach is to include models of the terrestrial and ocean carbon cycles in existing OAGCMs and run the augmented model with and without these feedbacks active.




Addition links on this article: http://climate.ornl.gov/