image
image image image image
 

CSIRO GASLAB Network: Individual Flask Measurements of Atmospheric Trace Gases (April 2003)

data Data

Investigators

L.P. Steele, P.R. Krummel, and R.L. Langenfelds
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)

DOI

10.3334/CDIAC/atg.db1021

Data are available for four atmospheric trace gases at nine stationary sites and one moving platform (aircraft over Cape Grim, Tasmania, and Bass Strait, between the Australian continent and Tasmania). The trace gases are carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrogen (H2). Measurements of δ13C from CO2 are also included in this database. The nine stationary sites are, from north to south: Alert, Canada; Shetland Islands, Scotland; Estevan Point, Canada; Mauna Loa, Hawaii; Cape Ferguson, Australia; Cape Grim, Australia (Tasmania); Macquarie Island, Australia; Mawson, Antarctica; and the South Pole station, Antarctica.

CO2 and CH4 are the two most effective anthropogenic greenhouse gases; CO and H2 influence concentrations of the hydroxyl radical (OH), thereby affecting the main sink for atmospheric CH4. H2 is produced in a sequence of reactions following the reaction of OH with CH4. Additional reactions involving these compounds and their importance for atmospheric chemistry are discussed by Langenfelds et al., Global Biogeochemical Cycles 16(3), 2002. The 13C isotope data are useful in identifying sources of atmospheric CO2.

Details of the instruments and their calibration, analysis procedures, and reporting standards are given in separate readme files for each gas (e.g., readmeco2.txt, readmech4.txt, readmeco.txt, readmeh2.txt, readme13co2.txt). Additional discussion of calibration and error terms for all four gases and δ13C is provided in the file: (calib.txt).

Questionable or flawed data are left in this data base and flagged, and the user is cautioned accordingly. The "readme" files provide explanations of each data flag symbol. Interpretations of results obtained by analysis of this database should be examined to be sure they do not result from the use of data that are questionable or unacceptable for the particular analysis.

Data from aircraft flights over Bass Strait are particularly variable because a) more than one air mass may be sampled on any particular flight, b) samples are taken at varying altitudes, and c) the plume from the heavily populated Melbourne area is occasionally sampled. Such data points often represent valid samples and analyses, and they may be useful for certain investigations; therefore, they are not flagged. CDIAC recommends contacting the providers of these data before performing any detailed analyses.

GASLAB Flask Sampling Network Data Available (April 2003)
Station Location Carbon
Dioxide (CO2)
Methane (CH4) Carbon
Monoxide (CO)
Hydrogen (H2) δ13C
  Beginning and ending dates for available dataa
Aircraft Bass Strait
Cape Grim
Jun 91
Sep 00
Jun 91
Sep 00
Aug 91a
Sep 00
Aug 91a
Sep 00
Jul 90
Sep 00
Alert, Canada 82E 27'N
62E 31'W
Apr 91
Dec 01
Apr 91
Dec 01
Jun 91a
Dec 01
Jun 91a
Dec 01
Jan 90
Jan 02
Cape Ferguson,
Australia
19E 17'S
147E 03'E
Jun 91
Dec 01
Jun 91
Dec 01
Aug 91a
Dec 01
Aug 91a
Dec 01
Aug 90
Dec 01
Cape Grim,
Australia
40E 41'S
144E 41'E
Jun 88
Dec 01
Aug 84
Dec 01
Feb 85b
Dec 01
Jul 91c
Dec 01
Jun 90
Dec 01
Estevan Point,
Canadaa
49E 23'N
126E 32'W
Jun 93
Dec 01
Jun 93
Dec 01
Jun 93
Dec 01
Jun 93
Dec 01
Jun 93
Dec 01
Mawson,
Antarctica
67E 37'S
62E 52'E
Jan 90
Dec 01
Apr 84
Dec 01
Apr 84
Dec 01
Feb 91a
Dec 01
Feb 90
Dec 01
Mauna Loa,
Hawaii
19E 32'N
155E 35'W
May 91
Dec 01
May 91
Dec 01
Jul 91a
Dec 01
Jul 91a
Dec 01
Sep 90
Dec 01
Macquarie Island,
Australia
54E 29'S
158E 58'E
Apr 90
Dec 01
Apr 90
Dec 01
Feb 91a
Dec 01
Feb 91a
Dec 01
Apr 90
Dec 01
Shetland Islands,
Scotland
60E 10'N
01E 10'W
Nov 92
Dec 01
Nov 92
Dec 01
Nov 92
Dec 01
Nov 92
Dec 01
Nov 92
Dec 01
South Pole,
Antarctica
89E 59'S
24E 48'W
Mar 91
Dec 01
Mar 91
Dec 01
Mar 91
Dec 01
Mar 91
Dec 01
Feb 90
Dec 01

a The date given corresponds to the first data available for analysis, although flask sampling began 2 to 13 months earlier, depending on station.

b Data are available from the last half of September, 1984; otherwise, the period of available data begins in February of 1985.

c Data are available from June 1988 and August 1990, otherwise, the record of available data begins in late July of 1991.

May 2003